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Posts from the ‘Money Sense’ Category

12
Aug

How much house can I afford?

by Larry MacDonald for Money Sense Magazine

Q: My fiancée Michelle and I are building a custom home together. We have a $1.5 million budget in mind but we’d like to go higher if we can afford to. Or should we actually be spending less? We need to make a decision and we’re not sure what to do.  Darren, Toronto

A: There is no doubt that you guys are in a unique position. Darren, you’re earning the entry level minimum this year, but hope your agent can negotiate a big contract next spring. Your career could last 10 years, but an injury or a bad season could easily cut things short. And it’s hard to say what your potential income-earning ability might be thereafter.

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13
Jan

Are TFSAs only good for the rich?

by Larry MacDonald for Money Sense Magazine

At the start of the year, the annual contribution limit for Tax-Free Savings Accounts rose by $500, allowing Canadians to shelter $5,500 in investments from tax each year, in addition to whatever RRSP room they may have. The Conservatives plan to go even further—if the federal government balances its books, something expected by 2016, it has promised to raise the TFSA contribution ceiling to $10,000 a year. But left-of-centre policy wonks oppose expanding contribution room. They say TFSAs favour the wealthy and lifetime contributions should be capped. Could they be right?

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11
Dec

Caring for Aging Parents

Canadians aged 85 and over represent the fastest-growing segment of the senior population. Start thinking about how you’ll care for your loved ones in this age group.

By Gail Vaz-Oxlade | for www.MoneySense.ca
Have you thought about what you’ll do when the time comes for your mom and dad to need extra help? It’s not something most of us think about. Used to parents who have been vital, who have been the ones doing the guarding, many of us are ill-prepared for the years when our parents may need extra care.

Canadians aged 85 and over represent the fastest-growing segment of the senior population. Eventually many of us are going to have to come to terms with parents who have fallen prey to the ravages of age. Our first instinct may be to bring them into our own homes. That’s the way it was when I was a girl growing up in Jamaica. My great-grandparents lived with my grandparents. Home care worked well because there were always bodies available to help. Here in Canada, where my grand aunt lived with my aunt and uncle, they eventually ran into the problem of having a parent who needed constant supervision when they both worked outside the home.

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©iStockphoto.com/ Catherine Yeulet
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