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Posts from the ‘Investing’ Category

21
Mar

The Estate Bond

Growing your estate without undue market risk and taxes

Often we see older investors shift gears near retirement and beyond.  Many become risk-averse and move their assets into fixed income type investments.  Unfortunately, this often results in the assets being exposed to higher rates of income tax and lower rates of return – never a good combination.

Or maybe the older investor cannot fully enjoy their retirement years for fear of spending their children’s inheritance.

The Estate Bond financial planning strategy presents a solution to both of these problems.

How does it work?

  • Surplus funds are moved out of the income tax stream and into a tax-exempt life insurance policy.
  • Each year a specified amount is transferred from tax exposed savings to the life insurance policy.

Read more

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16
Feb

Protecting Investments for Your Heirs

Many investors over the age of 60 find themselves in a quandary regarding investments that they intend to leave to their heirs.  The primary concern involves the desire to conserve the investments they are bequeathing while at the same time earning a reasonable rate of return.  As we all know, the volatility of the equity markets can be cruel and this can be most detrimental when investments do not have time to recover after a downturn.  As a result, many mature investors choose to accept low rates of return in order to avoid loss in the funds they wish to leave to family members.

If you share these concerns, then Segregated Funds (also known as Guaranteed Investment Funds) may be the solution.  Segregated Funds are similar in performance and cost to Mutual Funds but come with some very attractive advantages.  Since Segregated Funds are offered by life insurance companies, they contain guarantees both at maturity and at death.  Read more

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26
Jan

TFSA or RRSP? 2020

One of the most common investment questions Canadians ask themselves today is, “Which is better, TFSA or RRSP”?

Here’s the good news – it doesn’t have to be an either or choice.  Why not do both? Below are the features of both plans to help you understand the differences.

Tax-Free Savings Account (TFSA)

 Any Canadian resident age 18 or over may open a TFSA. Contribution is not based on earned income.  There is no maximum age for contribution.

  • For 2019 and 2020, the maximum contribution is $6,000.
  • There is carry forward room for each year in which the maximum contribution was not made. For those who have not yet contributed to a TFSA, the cumulative total contribution room for 2019 is $63,500.  This will increase in 2020 to $69,500.
  •  The deposit is not tax-deductible, but the funds accumulate with no income tax payable on growth.
  •  Withdrawals may be made at any time on an income tax-free basis.  Withdrawals create additional deposit room commencing in the year after withdrawal.

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13
Oct

Segregated Funds for Estate Planning

As we age and our thoughts turn to estate planning, Segregated Funds may present a valuable planning opportunity.  As we progress through the stages of life our investment focus changes from growth to income to preservation.  Usually, the expected rates of return reduce as we age, primarily because we have less time to make up for a loss and feel the need to be more conservative in our approach.  Anyone who has retired shortly before or after a major market correction (or crash!) understands the impact volatility can have on their enjoyment of a comfortable retirement.

In addition, none of us want to leave an estate for our heirs which could be a fraction of what was intended or be a catalyst for family discord.   Fortunately, you do not have to forego the opportunity of growth in order to preserve the capital that you wish to leave to your family.  Segregated Funds not only protect your estate against market fluctuations, they also provide the comfort of knowing the inheritances you wish to leave will be received by those for whom they were intended.

What are Segregated Funds?

Segregated funds are similar to mutual funds and represent market- based, equity, bond or fixed income investments.  They differ from mutual funds in that as they are offered by life insurance companies, they have special benefits that mutual funds do not.  These special benefits include: Read more »

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