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Posts from the ‘Living Benefits’ Category

5
Jan

The Importance of Critical Illness Insurance in Retirement Planning

There are a number of obstacles that could potentially de-rail a comfortable retirement. These include marriage breakdown, a stock market crash, and being sued. Another huge obstacle would be the diagnosis of a life threatening critical illness affecting you or your spouse. While it might be difficult to insulate yourself against some of the threats to retirement security, Critical Illness insurance goes a long way to mitigate the financial disaster that could result from a change in health as we approach retirement.

Considering that the wealth of many Canadians is comprised of the equity in their homes and the balance of their retirement plans, having to access funds to combat a dreaded illness could put their retirement objectives in jeopardy. Imagine that you are just a few years into or approaching retirement and you or your spouse suffers a stroke. The prognosis is for a long recovery and the cost associated with recovery and care is projected to be substantial. Statistics show that 62,000 Canadians suffer a stroke each year* with over 80% surviving* many of whom would require ongoing care. Since 80% of all strokes happen to Canadians over 60 those unlucky enough could definitely see their retirement funding jeopardized. Read more »

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3
Nov

Critical Illness – Are You Protected?

Why a Doctor Invented Critical Illness Insurance

Critical Illness insurance was invented by Dr. Marius Barnard.   Marius assisted his brother Dr. Christiaan Barnard in performing the first successful heart transplant in 1967 in South Africa. Through his years of dealing with cardiac patients, Marius observed that those patients that were better able to deal with the financial stress of their illness recovered more often and at much faster rate than those for whom money was an issue.  He came to the conclusion that he, as a physician, could heal people, but only insurance companies could provide the necessary funds to create the environment that best promoted healing.  As a result, he worked with South African insurance companies to issue the first critical illness policy in 1983. Read more »

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19
Oct

Boomer + Sandwich Generation + Club Sandwich + Boomerang = Financial Instability

The Sandwich Generation was a term coined by Dorothy Miller in 1981 to describe adult children who were “sandwiched” between their aging parents and their own maturing children.  There is even a term for those of us who are in our 50’s or 60’s with elderly parents, adult children and grandchildren – the Club Sandwich.   More recently, the Boomerang Generation (the estimated 29% of adults ranging in ages 25 to 34, who live with their parents), are adding to the financial pressures as Boomers head into retirement. It is estimated that by 2026, 1 in 5 Canadians will be older than 65. This means fewer adults to both fund and provide for elder care.  Today, it is likely that the average married couple will have more living parents than they do children.

What are the challenges? Read more »

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10
Jul

Long Term Care Insurance – Not Just for the Elderly

Whenever the topic of Long Term Care Insurance (LTC) is brought up, most people’s reaction is to automatically assume the discussion is about caring for the elderly.   While it is true that LTC coverage is a valuable tool to provide the necessary funds for when we are no longer able to care for ourselves, it should not be overlooked for younger people who are in the prime of their earning years but are unable to purchase the amount of disability insurance that they desire.

LTC insurance pays a monthly benefit to an insured who is unable to perform at least two of the six activities of daily living without assistance.  The activities of daily living are bathing, dressing, toileting, transferring (bed to chair or vice-versa), continence and eating.  It also pays a benefit in the case of cognitive impairment.  Anyone who has been in a serious accident, took a bad fall on the ski slopes, or suffered a debilitating illness or condition could probably have received a benefit from a LTC insurance policy if the condition lasted longer than the waiting period of the contract. Read more »

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